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Hurtigruten’s classic MS Lofoten to become training ship

Pressemelding   •   nov 26, 2020 12:22 CET

Photo: TROND GANSMOE JOHNSEN/Hurtigruten

After nearly six decades servicing the Norwegian coast, MS Lofoten is slated to leave the Hurtigruten fleet. From 2021, the Hurtigruten classic will become a training ship - educating future generations of seafarers.

Hurtigruten, the world leader in exploration travel, has signed a letter of intent with the Norway-based educational foundation Maritim videregående skole Sørlandet (Sørlandet’s Maritime High School) for the sale of MS Lofoten.

The 151-bed ship is due to welcome her first students in August 2021.

- This opens a new chapter in MS Lofoten’s rich and proud history. She has been a part of everyday life along the Norwegian coast for generations. Now, she will train the next generation of seafarers, Hurtigruten Group CEO Daniel Skjeldam says.

The school has trained young mariners since 1927. MS Lofoten will be their fifth training ship, where students live, work and practice their skills on board.

- There is a growing demand for skilled seafarers, especially those with a background from training ships. The acquisition of MS Lofoten is an important step forward for us. She is a true gem that deserves to be looked well after, says Tor Helge Egeland, the school’s director.

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Cadet training cooperation

With over 125 years of experience from year-round operations in some of the most challenging seas on the planet, Hurtigruten has a long legacy of supporting training and education of seafarers. Several former Hurtigruten ships serve or has served as maritime training ships.

As part of the sales agreement, Hurtigruten and the school have agreed to arrange for cadets to be educated and trained through apprenticeship programs also on other, operating Hurtigruten ships.

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Hurtigruten considering farewell cruises

MAIDEN VOYAGE: MS Lofoten arriving Bodø, Norway on March 8 1964 during maiden voyage along the Norwegian coast. Photo: Hurtigruten.

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Apart from occasional expedition cruises to destinations such as Svalbard and the British Isles, the 1964-build MS Lofoten - affectionally known as “The Queen of the Coast”- has served Hurtigruten’s Bergen – Kirkenes – Bergen scheduled service along the Norwegian coast.

Through the sales agreement, Hurtigruten has reserved the rights to charter MS Lofoten from the foundation during periods outside the school year.

Hurtigruten is looking into launching one or more MS Lofoten farewell voyages on the Norwegian coast in spring 2021 – if the Covid-19 situation allows for it.

- MS Lofoten is a special ship with a very rich history and a unique atmosphere. She is very special to many of us in Hurtigruten, to our guests and her crew. She has served us extremely well, and I am delighted to see her start her new life as a training ship, Skjeldam says.

The sale is pending final approval from both parties.

Daniel Skjeldam, CEO Hurtigruten Group

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MS Lofoten 

Year built: 1964
Shipyard: Akers mekaniske verksted (Oslo, Norway)
Passenger capacity: 400
Beds: 151
Crew: 37
Gross tonnage: 2621
Length: 87.4 m
Beam: 13.26 m
Speed: 15 knots

Since her launch in 1964, MS Lofoten has served on Hurtigruten’s scheduled service between Bergen and Kirkenes. During the close to six decades in service, she has crossed the Arctic Circle more than 3500 times and travelled a distance equivalent to more than 200 times around the equator.

MS Lofoten is still powered by her original Burmeister & Wain diesel engine. With over 330.000 running hours, the engine is known as the longest running marine diesel main engine in the world.